The Super Pi Case is done

 

Today I finished my RaspBuild. The first thing I did was add a few components to the PI itself. Storage is at a premium of course, so I went ahead and added to USB drives to the ports. To keep them small and unobtrusive I pulled the plastic covers off of the two PNY drives, and just left them sticking out. Since the plast circuit boards were a little loose in the metal sleeves, I dabbed a slight bit of hot glue on the ends. Hot glue played a major part in the finishing of the SuperPi case.

So after getting the Pi positioned, the next thing was to mount the power supplies. I replaced the cords I had cut with yellow and black for the 120v inputs. The Pi voltage goes through the yellow and white wire by the power supply with the big 5V on top. The fan supply on the left used its own cable, which I left on.

After getting the wires in place, I used globs of hot glue as strain relief on the newly soldered areas, and then flipped the supplies over and glued little plastic standoff feet under them. When everything was good and cool, I positioned the 5 volt supply, made a little mark on the base of the case, and quickly squirted hot glue on the bottoms of the little feet, flipped the board over and stuck it down. I did the same with the fan board, and then soldered the yellow and black wires to the 120 volt side.


This is a closeup of the switch detail. The red switch is the fan on/off switch, and the 0/1 switch was from the original power supply. Once the Pi has shut down, this switch cuts off both power supplies and the fan.

A closeup of the business end of the Pi inside the case. Even with two USB drives and a Keyboard transmitter, I have a free slot.

Finally complete and testing. The pi is powered by the internal supply, although the external supply works just fine. I added the blue and black wire in the middle of the picture to the blue light on the rear of the case. In line with the ground side is a 330ohm resistor to keep the light from drawing too much current, and I encapsulated the whole thing in… hot glue. You can also the a dab of it on the power leads to the pi, holding them out of the way on the bottom of the case. In the bottom right corner of the photo you can see a white plug with two prongs, which in the fan cord jack. It lets me pull the top completely off and get it out of the way.

Below I have the rear panel blue light running. I’m not sure what I might do with the other lights, but blue seemed appropriate sense the fan on top runs blue. One thing I noticed that was interesting – in a normal Pi case, the red onboard power light and the green Activity light don’t show up. They are quite hard to see unless you look just right. In the SuperPi case, they really show up well with all the reflections, and there is a side port right next to them where you can look inside and see them shining.

The finished SuperPi. Sure, its like putting 30inch rims, a spoiler, and undercar lighting on a Yugo, but its all in good fun. The BEST thing about all this was it cost me NOTHING.

I had the power supplies in a box from old projects, the metal case was free because it was a PC pull, the wires all came from old PC cables or the RasPi experimenter’s kit leftover parts, and we already had the hot glue gun. The plastic standoff feet were left over as part of a kit I bought for building the LightshowPi system. The only thing it cost me was a few hours work over two days.

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Author: theosus1

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